Making do...

As I've mentioned in a previous post, the table that was left in my house was under consideration to be refinished and lengthened. At some point I figured out that the curved base of the table makes tucking chairs under it impossible. So even if I was willing to pony up the thousands it would take to make this table large enough to host Christmas dinner on, its still not going to do the job. Sad really as its been in the house a lot longer than I have and I did want to keep it.

But we don't need a replacement just yet (I haven't even picked out chairs no less have them ready to be tucked in) so we're going to make do with this table for now. The apron, legs and base are all in pretty good condition but the top is in pretty bad shape. Some serious damage to the finish, some chipped areas in the veneer, water rings, nicks and scratches of all kinds. You name it, the top has it. I saw this product a few weeks ago and brought it home with me.
restorafinish
It promises to treat minor damage in a simple application. Here is the table "before"
Before
Hmmm..minor damage? Ok, so I was expecting miracles here. While Im usually in the a-picture-is-worth-a-thousand-words camp, these photos aren't telling the whole story. The before photo makes the table look a lot better than it did and the after photo doesn't show the vast improvement that was made.
After

Long story short - the table looks a lot better but not perfect. It was worth the few minutes and the few dollars it took. The nicks and scratches and minor water damage improved greatly, the more severe damage didn't go away but its slightly better.

11 comments:

  1. Maybe you can use a cool vintage tablecloth on it, you can still see the nice legs but cover up (and protect from further damage) the not so nice top.

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  2. It actually looks good enough as is. Its old so the damage adds to the charm. Well, not exactly but lets call it that,shall we? hehe

    I don't really care about damaging it further. If I do manage to sell it, any damage I can do will pale in comparison to the damage done over the last 50 years.

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  3. I think it definitly looks better. Plus I would think the imperfections are less noticeable once you're sitting at the table; the angle of the light coming in thru the window kinda accentuates them. I think the nicks and scratches add character!

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  4. I use that stuff all the time! I also use a hairdryer to get rid of white spots on wood.

    Looks much better.

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  5. I really want to paint that table an amazing color.
    Georgian Green!

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  6. I have always wondered how well the stuff works so guess I will have to give it a whirl sometime!?!?!?! Beautiful table...I hope you can find a way to make it work in the room :o)
    ~Des

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  7. have you ever tried Scratch Cover? it's like a stain, sort of, but it may help a little.

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  8. Hi there, what a gorgeous table. what a bonus to come with the house. If you had to replace it you could always use the table in your homeoffice. By the way I love reading your blog. I am renovating my limestone cottage in a beachy suburb in Australia. Its also Victorian (1895). I have just put in a "Somethings Gotta Give" style kitchen. Are you living in the property while renovating? Also, have you renovated before because you seem quite experienced at this?

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  9. The table isn't going to be long for this house so I don't want to put too much time or money into it...but this was really quick. It only took a few minutes. I'll definitely use it again on less damaged pieces of furniture.

    The renovation is now done but we didn't live in the house for most of it. It would not have been possible considering there was no heat or running water for most of renovation.

    Yes, I have renovated before in my last house but it was only small cosmetic changes like a new kitchen, finishing a basement, etc. No where near as extensive as this house.

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  10. Looks like you've made up your mind about the table, but I was going to say that lots of people put chairs at the ends of tables like this, and it's workable.

    In our much more modest Arts & Craft-ish row house in Brooklyn, we use an old library table as our dining room table. We got it at one of those "antiques"/vintage furniture stores, the kind that are now mostly found on 5th Ave. Eventually I will buy reproduction Windsor chairs to go with it.

    I love your upholstered chairs, and your couch looks great. We're in the market for a new couch with an updated classic style like yours, but it has to be a sleeper, and only about 72" - 80" wide. I envy your bigger rooms.

    Lots of luck to you!

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  11. Bklyn Thompson - thanks for the comments. How do you tuck chairs under there?

    The couch Im getting is 79 inches wide. Our house is only 20 feet wide so we can't afford to have one of these huge suburban behemouth couches.

    I would have prefered a 72 incher but I couldn't find anything I liked in that size.

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