Must Make This: Polaroid Scarf

I have a really long list of projects I'd like to attempt when I have some free time. I don't get to 99% of them but having a running list in my head helps me stay on top of things. Occassionally I'll see something that jumps right to the top of the list.



I spotted this amazing scarf on Hoopla the other day. The designer, Philippe Roucou created something simple yet gorgeous here. So gorgeous that nearly all of them have sold out, even with a healthy price tag on them.

Of course my internal cheapskate has me convinced I can do my own version, with my own photo for a lot less. I wear scarves quite a lot so I think something like this would make a perfectly fun accessory for me.

I can get silk printed but no clue how to finish the edges. How hard could it be? Anyone know how and want to give me (i'm really quite a terrible seamstress) some tips? Has anyone done this project already and want to give me the inside scoop?

24 comments:

  1. Callie Grayson9:12 AM

    They are pretty amazing, I love wear scarves even through summer. I have no clue, on how to finish the edges. I can't sew but wish I did.... I follow adventures in dress making blog. To get inspired to sew, she is amazing!, she also answered questions about sewing projects. I think she could help.
    Xx
    Callie

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  2. I saw this tutorial on pinterest for machine sewing a tiny hem: http://pinterest.com/pin/199988039672903582/

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  3. Emilee Wells11:10 AM

    If you could find someone with a serger that had a rolled edge hemming attachment, you could do a narrow rolled-and-serged hem.  That would be easy, and the hem would be completely  encased in thread, so you could go with a contrast or matching thread.  Or you could used a rolled hem foot on your sewing machine, which would do the rolling automatically, so you'd only have to worry about "driving" straight, and not about how straight your pressing was.  Since the hem is going to get very little stress, either of these options are viable and easy.

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  4. That sounds good but I dont know anyone with a serger as far as I know (nor would i have any clue of how to do a rolled hem). I wonder if my dry cleaner could do it?

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  5. Thanks Lisa. That looks interesting. I can't imagine being able to sew something so straight but maybe that ban roll helps?

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  6. Alandval201111:48 AM

    Oh man, if you find a tutorial, you MUST post it!  I'd love to do this too!

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  7. I haven't tried it yet, but it could be worth a test run. Good luck!

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  8. Try buying the scarf first from Dharma Trading Co.  They have very inexpensive white silk scarves (I've used them to make play silks, my cousin makes handpainted scarves with them) and then print on those.

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  9. Could you get your dry cleaner to do the edges for you?  Or your local tailor?

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  10. Pookie9022:28 PM

    You basically roll and then whip stitch for silk scarves, but it's not that easy, which is why I've never done it personally.  I would think you'd want to you light silk thread and perhaps coat with wax so that it pulls through smoothly

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  11. You could do a merrow hem with a serger.   I bet if you took the fabric to a drycleaner they'd do it pretty cheaply for you, and the hem would be very durable.   Take a look at this pic: http://tinyurl.com/7ub9zzl

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  12. Chaney3:05 PM

    Definitely try the rolled hem foot.  I used it for the first time abt 3 months ago to finish a sheer curtain.  So yeah, my cut wasn't exactly straight, and so it's a tiny bit wonky, but I got better with my second curtain panel.  Once you get the hang of it, it does all the work for you.  Super piece o cake, and the $5 dollar foot is way less expensive than a serger.

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  13.  I really should read other comments first, since mine now sounds redundant. :) 

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  14. When I generally work with silk the ends are always hand sewn, silk is so delicate. I would do a very small heam and roll it press and roll and press and then handsew you don't want the heam to be to large. Here is a good place to start http://www.coletterie.com/tutorials-tips-tricks/tutorial-make-a-silk-scarf . Also there is an image missing on your blog! 

    studionoeight

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  15. Deborah3:57 PM

    You can do a "roll & whip" technique used in french hand sewing.  Most certainly there is a you tube video out there to show you how.  It is very easy and somewhat therapeutic once you get going.  Good luck.

    Deborah

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  16. Robin5:15 PM

    IF all else fails you could use double fold bias-tape.  I can't wait to see what you come with!  I'm so glad someone loved these just as much as I did!

    Robin @ Hoopla Event Design and Styling

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  17. Wow fab scarf.  I wear scarves year round and  can't wait to see how you get on.  

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  18. Katie Hamer2:56 PM

    I am absolutely certain there is a seewing studio (in NYC, probably more like 40 sewing studios) at which you can get access to a serger.  the studio I go to in Washington, DC has open sewing hours every few weeks when you can sign up for space and use the serger if you bring your own materials.

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  19. Cathy8:43 PM

    pretty, pretty please, if you figure out how to do this, let me know and i'll order from you!!! i'm a photographer living in Tokyo (currently sewing machine-less) and would be over the moon to get my photos onto scarves. if you go ahead with the project, here's my email: cathy@cathyschusler.com  xxCathy

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  20. Miss B.12:24 AM

    Oh this looks like a fantastic project!  I bet you could do it at Spoonflower and have a local cleaners finish it for about $10 !  I want to do something like this now too!

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  21. Jennifer1:55 AM

    A bridal stitch just involves a slight roll of the edge, then hand-sewing the roll into place. And, a slight cheat is to iron the roll so that the crease remains during the sewing process. You can even try using a fabric glue, but most won't look very nice on silk... You could also maybe find a local seamstress that can do this for you in twenty minutes and for very cheap, if you don't want to risk it!

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  22. Apt20h2:10 PM

    You can just send your photo here:

    http://haydenharnett.com/?action=intro_bespoke_scarf

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  23. Very cool - thanks. Although at that price point, it's not that appealing.

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